Maple Syrup Adventure – Part I

The river bottom behind our house is filled with large maple trees.  As if we aren’t already busy enough trying to keep up with all of our kids’ activities and our other projects around the farm, we decided to try to make our own maple syrup after – you guessed it – seeing this great article entitled “Sugar From Trees” in the March/April 2009 issue of Minnesota Conservation Volunteer.  Our beekeeper friend also produces and sells maple syrup on a larger scale and Jesse went to observe his operation last spring.

Last fall, while the trees still had leaves, we identified sugar maple trees and marked them with orange tape.

As the weather started to warm up during the days this week into the low to mid 40′s (“warm” is a relative term when you live in Minnesota), we knew it was time to get the trees tapped.  The best syrup is made from maple sap after it first starts to run in the spring.  Tree sap starts to flow when temperatures rise above freezing during the day but fall back below freezing at night.

To tap the trees, Jesse and our oldest drilled holes into the tree trunks and inserted spiles. Sap drips out of the tree during the warm days and into the spile.  We purchased plastic spiles on-line from Leader Evaporator, but there are also metal ones.  I’m not sure why we got plastic, other than it was more cost-effective.

We also purchased some tubing to attach to the spiles to direct the sap into buckets sitting next to the trees.

The length of the sap run can vary, sometimes ending after only a few weeks.  Even though the tree sap flows through fall, once the weather warms up and stays above freezing at night, any syrup made from the sap won’t taste good any more.

We tapped a total of five trees, each with two spiles running into a five gallon bucket.  The temperature had already dropped below freezing when they were tapped tonight, so it was not evident whether the sap is running yet.  We have a large plastic drum to collect the sap in so that we can refill the buckets.  It takes around 40 gallons of sap to make a gallon of syrup!

There are a lot of steps that need to successfully be completed between collecting the sap and having maple syrup.  We need to collect the sap, keep it cool, cook it down the right amount, and boil it to the proper temperature.  I have no idea how this adventure will play out, but it always fun to try something new…even if we don’t really have the time.

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3 Comments

Filed under Daily life, Food, Maple Syrup

3 responses to “Maple Syrup Adventure – Part I

  1. mike roubal

    Hi 2 kids:
    We live in east central Wisconsin and also do syruping. I have syruped with my family for 20 + year’s. In the last few years my wife and I with our two daughter’s have started syruping with are friend’s in a different area. This area is along the wolf river which has mostly soft maple tree’s. The tree’s along the river (in the flood plain) don’t seem to produce as much sap as the trees in the higher areas. Do you guy’s have the same results.

    • Hi Mike,
      I have heard that sap won’t run if the trees have water over their root systems. Last year was a very fast warm-up for us in central MN, which not only reduced the typical freeze-thaw cycles that cause the sap to run, but it also made the river come up very fast and flooded our trees preventing a good sap flow. Not sure if you might have had the same situation at your location along the Wolf river…

  2. Pingback: Spring Preparations: Winter Sowing and Tree Tapping | Just Two Farm Kids

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